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Learning

Thinking

How to Brand a Bargain

February 16, 2017

By Sanjana Mathur

Everyone loves a bargain, whether it is free “dhaniya” from your vegetable vendor or a stylish pair of stilettos at half price, and that’s what makes it one of the main benefits that any brand considers offering its customers.

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Culture

Dear Walter

July 7, 2016

Palakshi Naha, Marketing Manager at Landor Mumbai decided to write to Walter Landor to commemorate his legacy of 75 years.

Dear Walter,

It’s your birthday in a few days and I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to write you a letter, to congratulate you and to thank you.

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Culture

Another Type of Learning

February 2, 2016

By Pavithra Dikshit

Type camp is an international organization that provides an alternative educational experience to anyone that wants to learn more about typography and design.

 My first run-in with Type Camp was through Adobe Typekit in February 2014. Adobe had sponsored me to attend Type Camp India at Chennai – a weeklong cultural immersion and a learning experience.  The camp changed me – I think different now; I also work different. This year, 2 Type Camps were organized in the first 2 weekends of January – in Mumbai and in Delhi. A seasoned camper, this time around I was teaching and assisting classes. My role was different but it taught me a lot:

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Work

Presentation Tips from a Designer

December 23, 2015

By Gazala Vahanvati

Not so long ago, I was fortunate to meet and work with a very special designer. She is perhaps the most opinionated of designers I have worked with. Of course, we shared a volatile work relationship filled with debate. However, when we did come to an agreement, that’s when we produced our best work. I learnt that the designer-strategist relationship at a branding firm like ours is a critical one–not just for generating our most creative work–but also presenting it beautifully. Here are a few tips I received from this designer to better my presentations. Everyone could use them–be it blogs, social media or presentations.

“Don’t put me to sleep.” The best presentations that I have been part of are engaging because they have substance (both factual and entertaining), they demonstrate the impact and they provoke action. Think of it as an opportunity to tell a story.

“Models fly over my head like rockets.” Being in the field of branding and marketing, we do tend to get a bit ‘jargon-y’ in our language. How can we make a point, simply, without relying on models and frameworks? Skype and Dropbox are successful examples of brands who could have swayed to the technical, but kept simply colloquial.

“Design your words.” Presentations require simplicity and crispness. It’s hard to read long sentences, let alone paragraphs, when you are at the extreme end of a 20-seater boardroom table. Pick every word carefully for its meaning and message. Keep it minimal.

“Make it look beautiful.” Creating an ugly presentation is disrespectful to our audience. Information we give should be presented in a manner that is pleasing to the eye, allows a natural flow and highlights the important points. We want the viewer to leave with a one crisp takeaway that they can action.

Thanks Designer. You know who you are! 

(Image source: http://mashable.com/2012/02/03/improve-business-presentation/#pDitK9KDpuqj)

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Thinking

Design as a Game Changer

August 24, 2014

By Lulu Raghavan

Like every harried parent who has to deal with restless kids in a restaurant, I succumb to the only available magical solution, the iPad. While its amazing kid-quieting capabilities continue to amaze me, my selfish motive continues to disturb me. Shouldn’t they be playing real games with real toys like I used to? Obviously, the founders of Tangible Play felt the same. They created Osmo, an amazing combination of iPad delight and real toys to give you a reality game rather than a virtual reality one. Osmo uses a simple plastic stand, a mirror, and some building objects but the engaging gaming experience it creates will make any parent want to kiss their feet.

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